Harlequin Artist Interview

Read our interview with the Harlequin artist
Natsu Momose...

Manga by Natsu Momose

The Greek Tycoon's Defiant Bride The Rich, the Ruthless and the Really Handsome II

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The Greek's Chosen Wife

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GIRL IN THE BEDOUIN TENT

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The Italian's Inexperienced Mistress

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The Ruthless Magnate's Virgin Mistress Virgin Brides, Arrogant Husbands 2

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Could you please introduce yourself?
Hi! My name's Natsu Momose, and I love romance more than eating 3 square meals!! My job is to turn Harlequin stories into manga.
What made you want to become a manga artist? Have you always wanted to be one?
My mom loves manga, and we had some in my house, which I used to read, so I've liked manga since I was able to read it. However, I first wanted to become a manga artist, when I was in college. At the time, a lot of my friends wanted to be one, and eventually I started to feel the same way.
How did you discover Harlequin?
My mom's always loved Harlequin, so our house was full of it. When my cat passed away, I felt desperately sad day and night, until one day I happened across a Harlequin novel, and it made me feel so much better.
Who are your favourite Harlequin authors?
How could I not say Lynne Graham and Betty Neels!? Recently, I've started to enjoy Andrea Laurence, too.
What's your favorite Harlequin book?
Without doubt Tempestuous Runion by Lynne Graham. And then there's The Italian's Inexperienced Mistress, The Greek's Chosen Wife and A Savage Betrayal. By Betty Neels, there's Dearest Rose, Roses and Champagne, and A Girl Named Rose. Finally, there's Susan Mallery's High-powered, Hot-blooded, Cathy Williams' Bittersweet Love, Helen Brooks' And the Bride Wore Black, and Andrea Lawrence's A Beauty Uncovered.
Which of your manga do you like most and why?
I've always loved A Savage Betrayal, so it was a real pleasure to be able to turn it into a manga recently.
How long does it take you to draw a manga?
It used to take me about 3 months per manga in total, but now I have a one-year-old daughter to look after it takes twice that amount.
Do you have any advice to give aspiring artists?
Above all try to make a manga that would blow your mind as a reader. Being a manga artist isn't about goals. If you can do that, you can call yourself a manga artist.
How do you spend an average day?
Reading Harlequin with a nice cup of coffee, and doing work.
Do you have any interests other than reading and manga?
Yoga. Doing it stretches your body, and clears your mind, which I think really helps me to work more efficiently.
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